Course Name Description Credits
BI101 Old Testament Survey Through readings, lecture and discussion, this course will survey the entire Old Testament. We will follow a historical approach, tracking the major people, events, and cultures along a chronological progression. Throughout our study together we will explore how the Old Testament shapes our understanding of God, His will for our lives and His great plan of salvation in Jesus Christ and the establishment of His eternal Kingdom. 3.00
BI102 New Testament Survey This course will survey the entire New Testament, looking at the Gospels (Matthew, Mark & Luke & John) with respect to how they relate to one another as well as the content they possess. The remainder of the books will be addressed primarily on individual basis. We will examine the historical settings, theological significance and overall importance of each book. Along the way we will discuss Old Testament connections to New Testament events/ideas, the radical nature of early church around which the books were written, and how it all points to – or stems from – the redemptive work of Christ on the cross. 3.00
BI202 The Gospels The life and teachings of Jesus Christ and his inaugurated Kingdom are central to the Christian faith. This course will explore His life and teachings as presented in the four theological biographies of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. It will also examine ways we may study these books for further understanding, including genre, literary framework, use of the Hebrew Scriptures, and each book’s individual characteristics. The overall goal is for students to know Jesus better through Scripture. 3.00
BI203 General Epistles Hebrews reveals how life in the Kingdom is grounded deeply in Christ’s work as High Priest. The General Epistles work out many of the practical implications of this new Kingdom life we share as the community of the King. This course will survey these books, presenting the literary structure, the theological implications, and the practical application to our present world. Most of the class time will be spent in the text of Scripture. 3.00
BI204 Romans St. Paul’s epistle to the Romans is, according to many scholars, the most important single theological treatise in the New Testament. Though it is certainly a pastoral letter, yet it is also a rich and comprehensive doctrinal treatment of the gospel.  One commentator refers to it as “The Gospel According to Paul.”This 3-unit survey course will take the student through the entire text of Romans, examining the flow and direction of Paul’s argument, the development of his gospel thought, and the application of that thought for Christians today both individually and as a community. 3.00
BIOL211 General Biology I Course content is intended for pre-professional students preparing for the biological sciences, science education, nursing and medicine related fields. Emphasis is on molecular and cellular biology, living systems and biological organizations. Topics include characteristics and origin of life, the nature and methods of science, cell structure and function, enzymes and energy transfer, photosynthesis and respiration at the cellular level, cell cycle (mitosis), reproduction (meiosis), genetics, DNA-RNA protein synthesis and regulation. Systematics, evolutionary thought and speciation, and the characteristics and reproduction of virus, bacteria, fungi, algae and plants, are also studied. Appropriate laboratory investigations will support this content. 4.00
BIOL212 General Biology II Course content is intended for pre-professional students preparing for the biological sciences, science education, nursing and medicine related fields. It extends and builds on concepts covered in General Biology I, such as the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems of plant and animal life, including man. Also covered are plant growth, regulation, reproduction, pollination and seed dispersal strategies. The attributes and systematics of the animal kingdom, invertebrate and vertebrate classes, organ systems and evolution, particularly of primates, are considered. Ecological concepts are studied on several levels: populations and population dynamics, community ecology, interactions and energy flow in ecosystems, climate and biospheres, and conservation biology. Appropriate laboratory investigations will support this content. 4.00
CE205 Introduction to Biblical Archeology This study will focus on the relationship between the Bible and Archaeology. Utilizing the complete array of sources available to the modern archaeologist, we will examine the main narratives of the Biblical story, book by book and period by period, to see how archaeology documents, illuminates, reconstructs, and testifies about the Bible as history and tradition. Emphasis will be placed upon learning the context of Scripture in order to foster stronger Biblical interpretation as an aid to its application for ministry, scholarship and personal spiritual growth. 3.00
CO101 Fundamentals of Speech Verbal communication is a God-given gift that benefits from training and practice in all areas of life.  This course examines aspects of communication such as listening, self-concept, self-disclosure, conflict resolution, and nonverbal communication. This course will observe, analyze, and apply concepts of interpersonal communication in relational contexts including friendships, family, church, and work. 3.00
CO120 English for Beginners This is a beginner English/Grammar course for those whom English is a second language. Students learn basic grammar structures and vocabulary of the English language through the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.  The class will cover many relevant topics including basic conversation, sentence structure, writing basics, as well as review basic English grammar. We will be using the Bible as part of our reading in each lesson. Christian music will be incorporated to help students to practice their listening, pronunciation, and reading skills. 3.00
CO201 Public Speaking Public speaking is a learned skill applicable both ministerially and in the professional arenas.  This course offers the student necessary training to effectively and persuasively communicate in the public speaking forum.  Building on skills learned in CO 101, students learn content, organization, and delivery of informative and extemporaneous speeches. 3.00
CS101 Counseling Field Experience This course is designed for students to explore the history, nature and goals of Christian counseling as well as the personal qualities associated with effective counselors. Students will have opportunity to observe and have direct exposure to a variety of counseling and have direct exposure to a variety of counseling settings and occupations. The course will also cove ethics and confidentiality required in specific settings as well as expected behaviors. The goal of the course is to provide students with a realistic view of counseling to compare/contrast to their perceived view. 3.00
CS105 Christian Counseling I Within a Biblical foundation Christian Counseling I focuses on basic counseling skills such as Discerning, Encouraging, Listening, Confronting, and understanding Personality Types.  In addition to skill building, this course also establishes the foundations of Ethics and Confidentiality necessary for the professional counselor.  Actual practice of counseling skills will be in and out of class.  This course is foundational and required to enroll in Counseling Practicum courses. 3.00
CS106 Christian Counseling II Christian Counseling II will focus on the dilemmas and issues that Christian Counselors most frequently encounter. There are two parts to the 15 week course. Part I and II will focus on walking with the client through both relational concerns as well as spiritual understandings of how God works through our pain. Some of the sessions included in this class are Tough Love Decisions (Boundaries) in Relationships, Growing Through Divorce, Blending Families, Remarriage Issues and Step-parenting . In addition we’ll address The Parent/Teen Dynamic, Accepting Life’s Losses, Discerning God’s Will with the Client and the Powerful Difference between True Guilt and False Guilt. 3.00
CS207 Group/Family Counseling The Group Counseling course is designed to offer students preparing to enter a helping profession with an understanding of group/family theory, and understanding of the types of groups used in group counseling, and the experience of being a member in a counseling group/family. The course focused on methods, problems, and leadership skills in working with a group. Include ethics. 3.00
FM102 Counseling Practicum I Building upon concepts and skills learned in Christian Counseling I & II, this course provides students with the opportunity to observe individual counseling techniques and skills in a supervised setting. Students will be mentored in the counseling process during sessions with peers and counselees. Students are required to complete minimum 45 hours of supervised experience. 3.00
FM201 Field Ministry Our purpose in cultivating the skills and knowledge that equip a servant in God’s Kingdom is for that servant to grow and bear spiritual fruit within the environment of applied ministry. To that end, this Course is designed to engage the student in individual and/or group ministry under the direction of a local Christian church, a ministry outreach agency or a community organization that emphasizes service and personal advocacy to those in need. Under the supervision of a Ministry Mentor as well as their PBC Instructor, the student will receive guidance, counsel and evaluation in the execution of tasks purposed to secure progress towards fulfilling self-directed goals in character growth and ministry skills. Such practical involvement will familiarize the student with the experiential, relational and logistical challenges that attend the practice of ministry in a real-world setting. 2.00
FM202 Counseling Practicum This course is designed to provide supervised counseling experiences for students preparing to work in the community. Students will provide direct counseling services to counselees, participate in weekly supervision and training sessions, write and present SOAP notes; personally review all videotaped sessions, present cases for supervision by faculty and peers, learn to supervise peer counselors. Total hours: 100 min. face-to-face counselees contact. 3.00
FM203 Counseling Practicum This course is designed to provide supervised counseling experiences for students preparing to work in the community. Students will provide direct counseling services to counselees, participate in weekly supervision and training sessions, write and present SOAP notes; personally review all videotaped sessions, present cases for supervision by faculty and peers, learn to supervise peer counselors. Total hours: 100 min. face-to-face counselees contact. 2.00
GK101 Introduction To Biblical Greek This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of Koiné Greek, the Greek of the New Testament. The primary objective of the course is to learn the essentials of Greek grammar in order to read the Greek New Testament. You will learn the Greek Alphabet, declensions of nouns, and be introduced to verbs. 3.00
HS101 Church History Survey History is part of God’s general revelation to mankind and as such has value to the believer in learning wisdom and living charitably among the wider Body of Christ. This course will provide the student with an overview of the major events, personalities, and movements of the Christian Church from its beginnings at Pentecost to the present day. Attention will also be given to the major trends and philosophical shifts in secular history that have either shaped the Church or were shaped by the Church. 3.00
HS102 Early Church History History is part of God’s general revelation to mankind and as such has value to the believer in learning wisdom and living charitably among the wider Body of Christ. This course will provide the student with an overview of the major events, personalities, and movements of the Christian Church from its beginnings at Pentecost (c.30 AD) to the rise of the Medieval Papacy at the end of the Classical period (c.600 AD). Attention will be given to the character of the church in the first centuries, the origins of the Christian monastic movement, the development of Canon and Christological doctrine through Patristic consensus and the Ecumenical Church Councils as well as the changes wrought by the rise of the Byzantine Empire and the Latin Church in Rome. 3.00
HS103 Medieval Church History The 5th century collapse of the Roman Empire in the West ushered in an era long misidentified as the “Dark Ages”. Contrary to popular understanding, the millennium we know today as the Middle Ages was a formative period of growth, not only for the Church, but also for the Christian culture which became largely synonymous with Western Civilization. This course will examine the development of that culture as it was shaped by new dynamics in theology, philosophy and Christian praxis, just as it was by the pressures of encroaching peoples, cultures and ideologies. Spiritual, cultural, academic and even technological changes, originating in the Middle Ages, still exert a profound influence on contemporary life. Our examination of these elements offers a deeper understanding of the Christian Faith in the modern world, as well as the God who created them both. 3.00
HS104 Renaissance and Reformation History is part of God’s general revelation to mankind and as such has value to the believer in learning wisdom and living charitably among the wider Body of Christ. The period we know today as the “Renaissance and Reformation” conjures in most modern minds a vague image of paintings and church squabble. In truth, this period (1400 – 1650) represents the most profound spiritual-cultural crossroads since Calvary. The seismic shifts which took place in technology, art, war, commerce, faith and philosophy ushered not just Western Civilization, but all of global humanity into the modern world. As Dante, DaVinci and Michelangelo helped shape the changing face of Europe, so did Wycliff, Luther and Calvin mold and direct growth of its spirit. From the Black Death to the Enlightenment, God’s hand is evident in the lasting imprint left by this era upon our own. 3.00
HS201 American Church  History This class presents a survey of major events and personalities associated with the development of the church in America. Puritan antecedents and the changes they underwent with the coming of the Enlightenment Era will be examined. Evolution in the Christian interface with indigenous peoples will be contrasted with American participation in global missions. Civil struggles with slavery, industry, depression and World War will offer opportunities to analyze the responses of the Christian Faith community to obstacles effected by changing theologies, values and social paradigms. The challenges of modeling Christ in an increasingly “post-Christian” culture will be explored as well. 0.00
MN203 Homiletics This course will equip the student to use their solid hermeneutic bible study methods in producing consistent Biblically accurate teaching/preaching which results in the continuing maturation of God’s church as people who know God intimately though His Word and live that out in their daily life. Throughout this course we will engage in exercises which hone this skill in light of the need to respect the authority of ALL scripture, continually keep the intended audience in mind, and deliver the sermon with proper decorum. Additionally, we will analyze sermons from those who have gone before us, such as Jonathan Edwards, George Whitfield, etc. 3.00
MTH111 College Algebra Examines in detail, the applied, real-world, and theoretical mathematical implications of the mathematical concept of a function.  Emphasis will be on solving problems symbolically, numerically and graphically and understanding the connections among these methods in interpreting and analyzing results.  Quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be studied.  This course is a transfer mathematics sequence for science, mathematics, and engineering students, and for general education math credit. A graphing calculator is required. 4.00
MU101 Beginning Guitar & Worship This two-unit course is designed for the beginning guitar player who is interested in learning the basics of worship guitar while growing deeper into the heart of worship. Commitment to daily practice and keeping up with the reading and writing assignments is another critical component. 2.00
MU201 Intermediate Guitar & Worship This two-unit course is designed for the intermediate guitar player who already has a solid grasp of basic chords and scales but wants to expand their knowledge and technique while learning more about the power and purpose of worship from a biblical perspective. Daily practice and keeping up with the reading and writing assignments are essential components for success in this class. 2.00
PH101 Worldview and Biblical Reality Worldview is the Operating System used by every human mind that has ever lived. As the cumulative outcome of our experience, beliefs, assumptions and choices, our worldview is the lens through which we perceive, ponder & interpret every sense impression and thought we experience. Most worldviews are taken for granted by their possessors, only rarely being subjected to examination of any kind. It is incumbent however, upon each believer to investigate his or her worldview in relation to its Biblical foundation as well as to it’s ability to answer the inquiries of logic and reason. This course will provide the student with just such an opportunity, by examining the development of Western philosophy, the nature of worldview and the methods of logic and apologetic associated with a reasoned defense of the Christian faith. 3.00
PS201 General Psychology This course is designed as an introduction to the field of psychology and the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. It will provide an introduction into the major principles and theories of human psychology. We will  provide an introduction into the major principles and theories of human biology of the mind, a basic understanding of the function of the nervous system, learning, sensation and perception, cognition, intelligence, consciousness, motivation, normal and abnormal behavior, psychological testing , emotion, stress, health, and social relationships. 3.00
PS202 Theories & Systems of Psychology A comparative survey of contemporary theories and their etymology from the field of psychology as they relate to the human condition. Primary goal is to develop Christian-based thought, through which to filter theories and systems, for assimilation into Christian counseling and ministry. 3.00
PS215 Life Span Development The study of psychological theories of human growth in the physical, cognitive, emotional, moral, and social domains: the usefulness of developmental theory for construction methodology integrated with Biblical thought to be implemented in counseling and ministry. 3.00
PS219 Abnormal Psychology This course explores a wide variety of psychological disorders, where students will learn the presenting symptoms, criteria, possible causes and treatments for each disorder discussed. A variety of class activities, such as a small group exercises, videos, case studies – are going to be integrated in the class to understand each mental disorder. Additionally, clinical assessment, diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behavior will be briefly discussed. By the end of this course, students are expected to increase their knowledge, critical thinking and integrate their Christian faith in the study and understanding of abnormal psychology. 3.00
SF101 Spiritual Formation Spiritual formation is the accumulative effect that individuals, events and processes have had on us in conjunction with our responses to them.  This course is designed to examine these elements and how we can maximize them for the Kingdom of God.  Spiritual formation is more than just what happens to us but what we allow God to do through us. 2.00
SF201 Vocational Ministry Training Christian vocational ministry presents unique challenges and training.  This course will provide the student with an introduction to the dangers, difficulties and obstacles common to vocational ministry, as well as the methods, techniques and precautions best-suited for their prevention or correction. While self-examination will be emphasized, attention will also be given to time-management, effective prioritization and biblical principles of administration in application to professional ministry. 2.00
SS203 Christ In Culture This course is an introduction to cross-cultural witness and Missions as presented in the Bible and practiced by followers of Jesus Christ throughout Church history; especially in the past several centuries. Selected biblical passages will be studied to better understand God’s mandate for His Church. Special attention will be given to the critical importance of culture and worldview in human society and the relevance they have for believers seeking to communicate the Gospel message in a cross-cultural context. Basic issues of anthropology and sociology will also be addressed as well as the process of preparing for, and entering into, long-term missional ministry. 3.00
SS204 Gender, Marriage, Family Systems God’s original design and purpose for mankind has remained the same since Genesis 1 and 2. He created male and female for relationship with Him and each other, forming the environment to marry and form a family unit, the foundational basis of society. This course will inductively study the Biblical theologies of this and comparatively analyze secular offerings. The student will access a complementary gender view as well as theologically grasp God’s plan, purpose and blessing in a marriage and family unit. 3.00
TH110 Bibliology and Hermeneutics The Evangelical Christian holds the Bible as God’s revelation of His reality to all men and as such, is foundational to all we know and experience. This course begins your journey to learn and apply theological thinking through academic study of the Bible. A survey of the languages, canonicity, and transmission of the Bible is presented, followed by its claims about inspiration and authorship. Interpretive methods, practice of the grammatical/historical method, and instructions on usage of critical thinking in one’s personal biblical understanding and application will also be covered. 3.00
TH110-C Bibliology and hermeneutics The Evangelical Christian holds the Bible as God’s revelation of His reality to all men and as such, is foundational to all we know and experience. This course begins your journey to learn and apply theological thinking through academic study of the Bible. A survey of the languages, canonicity, and transmission of the Bible is presented, followed by its claims about inspiration and authorship. Interpretive methods, practice of the grammatical/historical method, and instructions on usage of critical thinking in one’s personal biblical understanding and application will also be covered. 2.00
TH120 God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit This is a systematic theology course that covers the Christian doctrine of God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit. In this course we examine the biblical evidence for God’s personhood, his nature and attributes, the Trinity, the dual nature of Christ, and the person and work of the Holy Spirit. As we work our way through the historical and biblical importance of these doctrines, we seek to experience the Lord’s presence and power more deeply. Our main text is of course the Bible itself, though there is significant collateral reading. 3.00
TH120-C God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit This is a 2-credit course in systematic theology on the doctrine of God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit specifically tailored for the Counseling Track Students at Pacific Bible College. The difference between this class and the 3-credit TH120 version is that in this class there is no final paper and there are no written responses to the collateral reading. We will spend most of our class time in the text of Scripture seeking to understand the historic Christian perspective on the Person and work of God. 2.00
TH210 Man, Sin, and Salvation A study of Christian doctrine which develops a student’s personal integrated theology.  Systematic study of man (anthropology), sin (hamartiology), and salvation (soteriology), and atonement will be covered.  Each doctrine is reviewed historically and biblically with emphasis on critically applying the doctrine in one’s faith by integrating the student’s mind, heart, and knowledge of God into a coherent system that can be clearly communicated and exercised. 3.00
TH210-C Man, Sin, and Salvation A study of Christian doctrine which develops a student’s personal integrated theology.  Systematic study of man (anthropology), sin (hamartiology), and salvation (soteriology), and atonement will be covered.  Each doctrine is reviewed historically and biblically with emphasis on critically applying the doctrine in one’s faith by integrating the student’s mind, heart, and knowledge of God into a coherent system that can be clearly communicated and exercised. 2.00
TH220 Ecclesiology and Eschatology A study of Christian doctrine which develops a student’s personal integrated theology. Systematic study of the church (ecclesiology) and end times (eschatology) are covered.  Each doctrine is reviewed historically and biblically with emphasis on critically applying the doctrine in one’s faith by integrating the student’s mind, heart, and knowledge of God into a coherent system that can be clearly communicated and exercised. 3.00
WR110 Intro to Poetic Expression This course will introduce the main concepts of both poetic theory and poetic technique. It will cover a wide expanse of poetry from ancient Hebrew poetry to modern American poetry and will include instruction in how to read and write poetry in a verity of genre. This course is a broad immersion in the appreciation and production of poetry. 3.00
WR121 Intermediate College Writing This course will concentrate on improving vocabulary, writing technique, basic research and organization of abstract thought. It will use as models some of the best 20th and 21st-century non-fiction writing, both Christian and secular.  As Christians, we must be prepared to write about our beliefs with articulate precision and as students we need to be able to write well in other classes; this class will assist you in reaching this goal. 3.00
WR122 Advanced College Writing Writing 122 addresses the core of using language to write persuasively by presenting an overview of the history of English, a study of logical fallacies, and methods of rhetorical and cause & effect research writing. This course will require daily journal writing, at-home reading, and the writing of two major research papers. 3.00